theme
youpickitrs:

-nostalgia intensifies-

youpickitrs:

-nostalgia intensifies-


atwellling:

for kamala-skadoosh:  peggy carter as the winter soldier

Peggy, please…
Who the hell is Peggy?

happy p2 secret valentine, lexi. ♥ ♥ ♥

colbaltdrg:

mewiet:

retrogradeworks:

I love to see children who are so delicate and gentle with animals.  It warms my heart amidst a sea of brats pulling cats’ tails and getting whacked.

Also JESUS THAT’S A SNUGGLY CHICKEN.

I love how she reaches up on her tippy toes to snuggle into his shoulder.

To be more exact, that’s a hen. Which is the female. This is likely not his first encounter with her. My grandpa had chickens and hens, and if you visit them frequently like this they develop affection to you. I would know, because I sat in the chicken coop alot. The hens get a small maternal kick, and come to cuddle you because she wants to keep you warm, like she would do with her chicks. This means the boy has spent alot of time with her, and that just makes it more heart warming.


clannyphantom:

im excited for this generation of tumblr based teenagers to become parents because i think they will be aware and educated on all sorts of things like gender identity and mental illnesses and such but im also afraid of enrolling my kid into a kindergarten class full of Destials and Johnlocks


micdotcom:

It’s changing them — for the better 

Harry Potter’s greatest feat might not have been defeating Voldemort, but teaching young people around the world. At least that’s the finding of a new paper in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology.
What they become more open to | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

It’s changing them — for the better 

Harry Potter’s greatest feat might not have been defeating Voldemort, but teaching young people around the world. At least that’s the finding of a new paper in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology.

What they become more open to | Follow micdotcom



  • Suburban white young adult:  let's party!
  • Suburban white young adult:  *puts on Sum 41*
  • Suburban white young adult:  *is 25* *hits on 17 year old*


xkillerbunnyx:

g0ne-blotto:

paintingtherosesredd:

you just gotta love this guy

if you dont love rdj there is something very wrong with you

this man knows how to have fun with life


buttspectre:

why would you want to be an offensive stereotype for Halloween

when u can be

this

image



sadqueerpunk:

i’ve made a set of rules for myself to never date:

  • any cis person who doesn’t already know a decent amount about trans stuff
  • anyone who misgenders me at any point, for any reason, other than a complete accident or in otherwise unsafe situations
  • anyone who asks about my birthname out of curiosity

because i deserve better than that and you do too



"

The almost 30 million Americans like me who have rare diseases often live beyond the reach of popular charity events and other cause-related marketing events. In this context, awareness is certainly an important level-setting goal. However for so many more of us who live with chronic disease, more immediate needs like access to appropriate, ongoing health care have greater impact on daily life.

Of course I want a cure, but I also want to make sure my daily chest physiotherapy, a key component in prevention of infection and disease progression, is covered by insurance. I would love to live without PCD someday, but right now, my focus is on living the most productive life as mother, spouse, writer, and teacher that I can. To do that, I need the specialists, physical therapists, medications, and other medical interventions that keep me as well as possible.

Don’t misunderstand me. Raising money for cures is incredibly important, and the sense of community, hope, and optimism these charity events and assorted awareness activities often foster are indeed valuable. A more robust support system and more effective treatments are just some of the benefits they have made possible. What we also need is better patient understanding of how research funding is allocated and prioritized, more focused attention on the causes and true prevention of disease, including the prevention of disease progression, and consistent access to treatment.

One patient I spoke to with an autoimmune disease that affects the gastrointestinal tract gave the example of a charity race for his condition that he couldn’t participate in because there weren’t enough port-a-potties along the racecourse. Breast cancer advocates point to the problems of marketing a perfume to benefit research for a cure, when patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer treatment are sensitive to smells, and fragrances often contain chemicals considered to be carcinogens.

…Focusing on curing or beating illnesses can’t overshadow attending to the ongoing needs and realities of patients already living with them.

"

-Laurie Edwards http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-the-kingdom-the-sick/201306/the-risks-slacktivism-when-it-comes-chronic-illness

A friendly reminder that cure-focused narratives are unhelpful even for those who actually have diseases.  It may be worse for autistic people, who don’t even have a disease or necessarily want a cure, but it doesn’t help anyone.

(via youneedacat)


blackdenimjeans:

Me: *at a white persons house*
Friend: my moms making dinner.. Spaghetti with ketchup
Me: my mom said I gotta come home right now immediately